Archive for the ‘Marketing’ Category

Changing Direction In The Best Way Possible

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

ptpibFor years, Thermwood Corp. produced custom routers for the woodworking and plastics industries. But while customization made customers happy, it wreaked havoc at Thermwood.

Its engineers couldn’t keep pace with the design requirements of its customers and, as a job shop, it couldn’t exploit any process or cost efficiencies. In fact, customization was putting the Dale, Ind.-based manufacturer out of business.

To turn itself around, Thermwood cloned the advertising techniques of leading PC makers and adopted a radical – for it – marketing approach that flies in the face of what many gurus are preaching today: Thermwood shifted to a standardized product line.

Thermwood’s top-to-bottom marketing overhaul has pulled the company back from the brink after fundamental changes in its business had pushed the company close to extinction.

Custom product, low profit

“Business

Technology Changes Research Markedly

Monday, November 30th, 2015

tcrmRichard Hare’s new briefcase epitomizes changes hitting the average business research company.

The senior VP-general manager-North East of Elrick & Lavidge, Paramus, N.J., used to carry his cellular phone, laptop and other modern business accoutrements with him, but as work began infringing more into his personal life, he soon found his conservative leather briefcase impractical.

“We are all stuck in business 24 hours a day, seven days a week,” Mr. Hare says. “I got so tired of transferring all of my electronics from a briefcase to a ditty bag, I decided that if I’m going to live my life as much as my job, I’m going to get one bag that will be good for everything.”

Thanks to the ongoing communications revolution, many in business research, like Mr. Hare, are finding that

Pressing The Press Is Best

Monday, October 26th, 2015

ptpib

Under Chairman Jack Welch, GE has shunned owning businesses that aren’t No. 1 or 2 in their markets. That’s a tack Reed wants to follow.

“If we can’t be a leader in a field, then it probably won’t be a strategic priority,” says Brian Kardon, senior VP-marketing and chief marketing officer at Reed Elsevier Business Information.

Being a leader got a lot easier for the company last month, when Reed Elsevier PLC’s Cahners Publishing Co. completed its $447 million purchase of the Chilton Business Group, Radnor, Pa. After the merger, both companies were combined to form Reed Elsevier Business Information.

“The Chilton publications helped us get stronger where we already had strength,” Mr. Kardon says.

Reed Elsevier Business Information currently has 131 publications, 4,000 employees and more than 7 million subscribers, making it …